MTRF Funded Projects

Since 2006, through the MTRF, the College has made a significant contribution towards Massage Therapy research studies conducted by researchers, massage therapists working with researchers, and massage therapists undertaking graduate studies from across Canada.

Highlights about the MTRF:

  • Over $330,000 in grant funds have been awarded;
  • 21 Massage Therapy research projects from across Canada have received MTRF funding;
  • 4 Massage Therapists pursuing research training through a Masters or PhD program at a Canadian university have been supported through the MTRF;
  • Researchers in 7 provinces from 20 different research institutions in Canada (universities, teaching hospitals and colleges) have received MTRF grants.

To ensure registrants’ access to the findings and knowledge generated through MTRF funded studies, we provide a summary of each funded project in progress and a critical overview of each completed project.

 

MTRF Funded Studies – COMPLETED

Name, title, grant amount, year received Pdf links
Amanda Baskwill, Humber College
Title: Exploring Utilization and Knowledge of, and Attitudes, Barriers and Supports to Evidence-Informed Massage Therapy
Grant amount: $5000
Grant received: May 2013
Project Summary: As a society, we expect professionals to be aware of the latest studies and use this information to stay current. This study proposes to investigate the extent to which Registered Massage Therapists in Ontario use evidence in their practices, what they think about evidence, and what perceived barriers and supports exist in relationship to evidence-informed practice. Results of this study will allow the profession to help RMTs use more evidence in practice to provide safe and effective care.
Baskwill – MTRF project summary – coming soon

Additional files:

Dr. Fuschia Sirois, Sherbrooke University
Title: The effects of Massage Therapy on the anxiety and sleep quality of individuals with fibromyalgia: A pilot study.
Grant amount: $17,850.40
Grant received: May 2013
Project Summary: In addition to pain, people with fibromyalgia experience sleep disturbances and anxiety. This study will examine the effects of 8 weeks of Massage Therapy on the sleep quality and anxiety symptoms of fibromyalgia patients, and its associated benefits for psychological well-being. We propose that Massage Therapy may be an effective way to improve sleep and anxiety among people with fibromyalgia that can enhance their quality of life.
Sirois – MTRF project summary – coming soon

Additional files:

Pamela Hammond, Princess Margaret Hospital
Title: “Today I understand it better”: Evaluating breast cancer patients’ success in learning lymphatic self-massage at the Princess Margaret Hospital Lymphedema Clinic
Grant amount: $14, 627.50
Grant received: 2010
Hammond – MTRF Project Summary

Additional files:

Jean Paul Collet, BC Children’s Hospital
Title: A pilot study to assess the feasibility, efficacy and safety of a massage intervention to affect changes in the autonomic nervous system of ICU pediatric patients with SIRS
Grant amount: $14,964
Grant received: 2010
Collet – MTRF Project Summary

Additional files:

Bernadette Nedelec, Centre de recherché du Centre hospitalier du L’Universite de Montreal (CRCHUM)
Title: Preliminary evaluation of the effect of massage on adult burn scars
Grant amount: $13,294.10
Grant receive: 2010
N/A
Cathy Fournier, Wilson Centre for Research in Education, Toronto General Hospital
Title: Professional status within an interprofessional context: A view of Massage Therapy
Grant amount: $5,840
Grant received: 2010
Fournier – MTRF Project Summary

Additional files:

Lucie Brosseau, University of Ottawa
Title: The implementation of bilingual clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) on effective massage for neck, back and tendonitis amongst educators
Grant amount: $14,781.30
Grant received: 2010
Brosseau– MTRF Project Summary

Additional files:

David Behm, Memorial University of Newfoundland
Title: The effect of massage on range of motion and muscle performance
Grant amount: $14,687.73
Grant received: 2010
N/A
Ania Kania, University of Calgary
Title: Hospital-Based Massage Therapy – A Survey of Canadian Hospitals
Grant amount: $7,894
Grant received: 2009
Kania – MTRF Project Summary

Additional files:

Wayne Albert, University of New Brunswick
Title:
The effects of therapeutic massage on muscle oxygenation in fibromyalgia patients
Grant amount:
$14,690
Grant received:
2009
Albert – MTRF Project Summary

Additional files:

Kimberley Dawson & Peter Tiidus, Wilfred Laurier University
Title: Effectiveness of Regular Proactive Massage Therapy for novice recreational runners
Grant amount: $14,981
Grant received: 2008
Dawson & Tiidus – MTRF Project Summary

Additional files:

 

Donelda Gowan-Moody & Anne Leis, University of Saskatchewan
Title: Massage Therapists’ research utilization and perceptions towards research
Grant amount: $8,929
Grant received: 2008
Additional files:

Gowan-Moody – published article

Victoria Wiltshire & Michael Tschakovsky, Queen’s University
Title: Massage and post exercise muscle lactate removal
Grant amount: $9,000
Grant received: 2007
Wiltshire & Tschakovsky – MTRF Project Summary

Additional files:

Patricia Janssen, University of British Columbia
Title: Massage Therapy and labour outcomes
Grant amount: $13,000
Grant received: 2007
N/A

 

Robert Gilbert, Dalhousie University
Title: Use of Massage Therapy to reduce anxiety and improve sleep in patients participating in an inpatient withdrawal management (detox) program: a randomized controlled pilot study
Grant amount: $7,000
Grant received: 2007
Gilbert – MTRF Project Summary

Additional files:

Trish Dryden & John Barrett, Centenntial College and Sunnybrook and Women’s College Health Sciences Centre
Title: Women’s experience of Massage Therapy during high risk pregnancy: A qualitative study
Grant amount: $20,000
Grant received: 2007
Dryden & Barrett – MTRF Project Summary

Additional files:

MTRF Funded Studies – IN PROGRESS

2013/2014 MTRF funding competition – Grant recipients

Dr. Anne Leis & Donelda Gowan-Moody, University of Saskatchewan
Title: Development of a taxonomy of adverse events in Massage Therapy: a modified Delphi consensus study.
Grant amount: $19,479.00
Granted received: May 2014
Project Summary: While both use and evidence of the benefits of Massage Therapy is growing, the issue of safety has been understudied. This study will ask experts in the regulation of Massage Therapy in Canada to share their opinions about what harm can come from Massage Therapy treatment. Their agreed upon definitions and descriptions will be helpful for collecting information about adverse or negative events in Massage Therapy that have happened or may happen in the future.

Dr. Greg Wells & Gillian White, University of Toronto
Title: The effect of Massage Therapy on inflammatory mediators in skeletal muscle employed at rest and following high-intensity intermittent sprint exercise
Grant amount: $20, 000
Granted received: May 2014
Project Summary: Massage is used as a recovery tool by athletes to help muscles heal from a hard workout and perform better, faster. Although it is a commonly used therapy, we still do not know a) how effective it is b) how it is helping recovery. We will measure performance and inflammatory markers to investigate whether inflammation is the primary muscular factor affected by massage to promote recovery from hard exercise.

2014/2015 MTRF funding competition – Grant recipients

Dr. Martin Descarreaux, Université du Québec à Trois-Rivières
Title: The effect of massage therapy on trunk muscular fatigue in patients with chronic low back pain
Grant amount: $24,000
Granted received: September 2015
Project Summary: Massage therapy is a common treatment for low back pain and other spine related syndromes as it is believed to be a safe and efficient approach. However, the specific mechanisms underlying the clinical effects of spinal massage therapy remain uncertain. The main objective of this research program is to determine if massage therapy can reduce muscle fatigue effects and improve low back pain symptoms in individuals with chronic low back pain.

 

Dr. Nathaly Gaudreault, Sherbrooke University
Title: Can massage therapy promote recovery of locomotion following spinal transection?
Grant amount: $47,158
Granted received: September 2015
Project Summary: After spinal cord injury, motor rehabilitation cannot be initiated in the short-term due to pain. However, massage therapy can be initiated early and could promote motor recovery. The aim of this project is to determine the effect of massage therapy on locomotor recovery and neuromuscular function following complete spinal cord injury in a well-established animal model. The results will provide important new knowledge on potential benefits of massage therapy in maximizing functional recovery.